The Future of Learning is Bright

I am in an optimist: I see the topic as half learned.  Recently, I was surfing the web looking for information on learning and I thought I would share some of that.

I was thinking about the Book the Fifth Discipline by Peter Senge.  Here is a video interview with Peter Senge.

Systems thinking.
The key point is that systems thinking is not new.  However, we need to be continually reminded of this obvious fact.  As long as we have been around we have realized that we are interconnected.
http://www.moresteam.com/toolbox/system-diagrams.cfm  explanation of system thinking diagrams.
http://www.systems-thinking.org/intst/int.htm  explanation of system thinking diagrams.
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Musings from a course I am teaching sparked by student comments:
Mainframe –> Desktop –> Laptop –> Tablet –> Smart phone –> ? –> ?
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In a blog on Mindflash.com I found this great quote:

The “best” method of training isn’t set in stone; it’s determined entirely by which one best fits the particular need.

A contractor can’t keep hitting a nail with a wrench and expect it to work. But that’s not the wrench’s fault — it’s the contractor’s fault for using a tool that isn’t well-matched to the task at hand. The wrench is, in fact, an excellent tool, when used in the right context.

We see this all too often in the learning and performance field. We blame the tool for how it’s used.

You can read the entire article here:

http://www.mindflash.com/blog/2012/03/formal-training-vs-informal-learning-which-makes-more-sense/

 

Jim Sutton

Facilitating Performance Improvement in the digital age

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